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>> >> >> >> >> councilmember wong. >> good afternoon and welcome to the mayor's disability council, room 400,san francisco city hall. our meeting is fully accessible to persons using wheelchairs. assisting listening devices are available. our meeting is open captioned and sign interpreting is available. braille is available. ask staff for any assistance. the respect everyone's ability to focus on the presentation, please either turn off all mobile phones and pdas, or change these devices to vibrate mode. your cooperation is appreciated. we welcome the public's participation during public comment. you may complete a speakers card available in the front of the room. the mayor's disability council meeting are generally the third friday of each month. our next regular meeting will not be until january 18, 2013, from 1 o'clock to four o'clock here, san francisco city hall, room 400. call the mayor's office on disability for further information or to request accommodations at 415-554-6789. voice. or 415-554-6799, tty. a reminder to all of our guests today to speak slowly into the microphone to assist our
will miss you here, and all your work with disabilities (singing) we will be alone without you. maybe you will see the water blue, blue. and you will have a lot of warm climate. and it will make you smile in the island sun. and i hope but most of all, you have lots of fun... whether i'm disability right, disability wrong, whether i find a place in the city, i've got to be me, i've got to be free, with disability, i'm willing to try, do it or die, i have to be disability free. our world -- is waiting for you. i know you won't fall down. you won't settle for disability. if you could have it all. i've got to be free. you've got to have a better disability, willing to try, do it or die. you've got to be disability free. thank you. see you later. >> thank you so much mr. poston, you always brighten our day. aloha. do we have - this is a familiar face, our next public speaker is my former cochair -- welcome back. >> thank you very much. i am honored to be here today. it's bittersweet. i do know that you are going on to why as well. i work with you for over five years. you you have been a
and gentlemen, welcome to the mayor's disability council. denise, would you please read the welcome? >> i'm almost afraid. try again. let me turn on the mic, i'm on. welcome, everyone and thank you for the third time for waiting. we're going it kind of give you highlights of our accessibility policy here at city hall so bear with me as i go through some of the information. city hall is accessible to persons using wheelchairs and other disabilities. the polk street carlton b. goodlett entrance is accessible via a ramp and wheelchair lift. assistive listening devices are available and the meeting will be sign language and captioned. agendas are available in large print and braille. in order to accommodate people with severe allergies, environmental illnesses, multiple chemical disabilities please refrain from wearing skepblted products to mdc meetings or to the mayor's office on disabilities. this includes perfume, scented lotions, hair sprays. thank you for helping provide the meetings are fully accessible for people with disabilities. for people with disabilities or others who can
sro tenants who live in chinatown, mission, central city area, seniors, people with disabilities. we had a wide range of questions. it is focused on being a needs assessment. to see what sort of needs the population was facing so we could identify recommendations slowly work to implement those recommendations. we have a couple of other people who will speak about those things today. i will turn it over to jessica at this point to talk a little bit more about what the results of the report were and some of the recommendations that came out of that report. >> thank you. thanks so much to the council for having us here and thank you to joanna fraguli for coordinating this. it is exciting work. it is wonderful to get into it and we see a lot of potential for making positive changes. i will pick up where josh left us, talk about the survey and the results, and go through the series of recommendations leading to one civic recommendation that is now in legislation. the top concerns found in the survey were widespread, sadly. there were all kinds of problems.. people talk about a
you won't settle for disability. if you could have it all. i've got to be free. you've got to have a better disability, willing to try, do it or die. you've got to be disability free. thank you. see you later. >> thank you so much mr. poston, you always brighten our day. aloha. do we have - this is a familiar face, our next public speaker is my former cochair -- welcome back. >> thank you very much. i am honored to be here today. it's bittersweet. i do know that you are going on to why as well. i work with you for over five years. you you have been a mentor and a friend. we won't go into those too much. >> i do! (laughter) >> being a blind person, i have a different approach, a different need in a way to get to know people. i cannot see faces at all. i got to make up what i want people to look like. i usually make them like greek gods and goddesses. which was also the case with jewels. except with jewels i made her out to be a swimsuit model, which will be handy in hawaii. seriously, when i got to look into the insight of her to get to know her i saw a person with extreme pas
that in the legislation so it does not become an issue for a person with a disability. >> i'm glad you said that. i am embarrassed to say we have not talked about it. we will explore that right away. >> thank you. (off mic) >> my name is clifford gilmore. i and a community organizer with the central city sro collaborative; we are the community organizing department for -- housing clinic. the focus is to have this ability and tenant rights issues; our mission is to keep people housed and to have quality housing as well. our coverage area is south of market, there are 250 sros in that area. we have drop-in services; people can come and talk about living conditions and seek remedies for some of those issues. part of what we also do is outreach in the community. it is a natural thing for us to be part of the survey. on the campaign on seniors and people living with disabilities. i want to mention a couple of things quickly. we would like for you to consider going forward. many of the sros are not accessible. that is one thing. and buildings and floors that are accessible, the preference be provided
of the aisle historically who have fought for the disabled. that's a very important fact today, and his presence, his strength, and determination were very inspiring. we appreciate so much his testimony. mr. kerry: mr. president, i suggest -- the presiding officer: the senator from massachusetts. mr. kerry: i suggest the absence of a quorum and ask that time be charge against both sides. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. durbin: mr. president? the presiding officer: senator from illinois, the assistant leader. mr. durbin: i ask that the quorum call be suspended. officer without objection. mr. durbin: we are in the process of considering the ratification of the convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. the united states has led the world in creating the legal framework building an infrastructure and designing facilities that ensure inclusion and opportunities for those living with disabilities. this year the senate foreign relations committee under the leadership of chairman john kerry and ranking minority member richard lugar celebrateds
of which will be by deputy director fraguli, with the mayor's office on disability. >> it is my great pleasure to do the third and final installment of our housing series. as you may remember, in the past two months we have been attacking the problem of supporting housing. we heard from the human services agency. in most of those programs, the city provided supporting housing programs, primarily people with disabilities and seniors. one of the major housing areas were single room occupancy hotels or sros. sros for those of you who don't know, are primarily single room dwellings, most commonly without a kitchen and with a shared bathroom. in most cases they are renovated, older style hotels. there are over 500 sro buildings in the city. housing approximately 30,000 individuals. those are the extremely low income, primarily people with disabilities, seniors, and although most of the sros are private and not under the jurisdiction of the city there are a number of them that we use through city contracts to provide our services. apparently, there are a lot of groups in th
with disabilities and sros have what they need but are less clear on how to implement. those include the ability to form a tenant council, not attended by management so that people can speak freely. affordable housing for seniors and adults with disabilities, proposition c is a step in the direction. on-site staff that includes maintenance and janitorial the people are not waiting and trying to figure out who to talk to. individual locking mailboxes, so when someone gets a bill or a check they can get it safely. wellness check, or "i'm ok" door hangers. someone who want to participate, if a neighbor does not see that this is someone they can check on. there was a lot of information. now i will go into more detail on the legislation that we are proposing. in the recommendations, we suggested having grab bars in bathrooms. in the server we found that less than half of seniors and people with disabilities that we talked to reported having grab bars. not everyone is coming out and saying we need grab bars. people don't necessarily realize that is a problem until people fall. we know that is
seniors and people with disabilities in sros to say we demand and deserve better. so that people can also say this is not what should be going on in our city. will like some of you to come out with us on that day, to the rally. maybe somebody representing the council should speak. testify before the land use committee that they. will be in touch with the mayor's office; presumably they will pass on to all of you when those things are happening. >> chair: jessica, i think the idea of including the mayor's disability council and the technical assistance guidelines is excellent. my colleagues are interested in that. before i -- have you been in contact with chief inspector bosky at the department of building inspection? she may be able to offer support as well. >> we have been working closely with rosemary bosky (sounds like) since the beginning; she has been wonderful, helping us understand what is in the code, what should be in the code, making amendments to the legislation as well. >> thank you. >> thank you for your presentations. my head is swimming actually. i would like to say th
and visitors and of course individuals with disabilities. this is the mayor's disability council of physical access committee. mr. chadner has served as the chairman on the physical access committee forum for more than 5 years and has chosen to resign to pursue other interests and activities. the council expresses its deepest gratitude and appreciation for howard's volunteering on this committee, his leadership and caring for the community at large. always he has let participate papts have their time, express speech and opinions on issues vital for san francisco's well-being. he has an inclusive style. certainly he will express his opinions. both strong-willed and well thought out. john paul scott, the deputy director of the mayor's office on disability, will discuss some of the major projects that he and chadner have shepherded through the community. the list is impressive though these projects howard promotes accessible design, good design and most importantly, universal design, design that seeks to meet and exceed the needs of the broadest range of people's needs and disabilities. af
the idea of including the mayor's disability council and the technical assistance guidelines is excellent. my colleagues are interested in that. before i -- have you been in contact with chief inspector bosky at the department of building inspection? she may be able to offer support as well. >> we have been working closely with rosemary bosky (sounds like) since the beginning; she has been wonderful, helping us understand what is in the code, what should be in the code, making amendments to the legislation as well. >> thank you. >> thank you for your presentations. my head is swimming actually. i would like to say that what we are talking about here - most of my colleagues would agree - clean, affordable housing are human rights. in the city of san francisco we have resources to see to it that that is the fact. with that said, first i want to talk a moment about bedbugs. i have a friend in an sro on jones -- he went through quite an ordeal to get management to respond; he call the department of public health. there were people in the building who were undocumented. others for whom i
a keynote speaker, dr. lisa iasoni (sounds like), a woman with disability. a professor at harvard. a researcher in health studies. written a book called more than rems. in her book she make the argument that an accessible built environment is one where people can bike, hike, roll, and when you are out engage the community you get the benefit of not only of better health but better mental health and better connection. she was an inspiring speaker. we also had a series of panelists including jesse lorenz (sounds like), laisha home (sounds like), elizabeth stamp from walk sf, our own christina -- from the board of directors, over 40 people attended the afternoon session in over 30 that attended the evening session. the discussions were dynamic and productive. we will be summarizing the comments that people made and the stripping those the people who were not able to attend. we were very excited about that. i also want to give a recap on the giants' celebration. it was a resounding success. i think that we were successful because we learned so much from the 2010 event. ther
. you have existing tenants on the bottom floor. and so many disabled and seniors in one building that you start going floors up anyway. can something be done with tax breaks? something to get modern elevators in these buildings? >> tax breaks are not my specialty. >> (off mic) not to pass the buck, by the financial and physical feasability, we have not seen this as a political issue. maybe we could organize around that. >> the councilmember suggestion of tax raises an interesting one. the technical challenge of replacing an existing elevator, the financial challenge of replacing it, we are talking about millions of dollars at times to do this type of work. it's complicated. >> thank you. >> chair: thank you. i lived in a 100-year-old building for 15 years. the elevator was never broken down. if you have enforcement, if the elevator breaks down and penalties apply that might be of assistance. >> if i could comment chairperson. one of the comments of councilmember -- is that older elevators have parts that have to be custom fabricated in order to make a repair. you do
person with invisible his disabilities, a person with different challenges than a person with a wheelchair and mighty the first floor too. i have a friend. they're having a hard time because they don't have visible disabilities. what do you guys do about that? i know we don't have the time. but maybe you can send us back some information. tell us about some steps that you go through to get help like that. and if they are giving the same opportunity as a person with a physical disability. >> i will say briefly that that is definitely something that we talked about in looking at things that people have access to services, getting good information, that the enforcement is good. we want to make sure that is true for every person with a disability. in looking at the enforcement, the idea came out early on and i'm sorry, i will go on too long, having a separate enforcement time if the problem affects a senior or person with disability. how do people document whether the person had disabilities? that gets complicated. a lot of people get left out. those of things tha
. that was the signing of the disabilities law on the white house long. bipartisan members of the disabled community were there. the president of the united states, george herbert walker bush, and so many others. but also one of the prime individuals that was largely responsible was our beloved leader at that time, bob dole. a man who epitomized, in my view, how a disability can be overcome and go to the highest levels of american government. i freely admit that i love bob dole, i listen to him, i appreciate his leadership. i think the majority leader would agree that we appreciate his bipartisanship during a great deal of his time. i hope my colleagues would, before deciding to vote, at least listen to the letter that was addressed to all of us by senator bob dole. as you may know, tomorrow the senate -- that we received yesterday. as you may know, tomorrow the senate will vote on crpd. unfortunately, i am currently at walter reed and so cannot call you personally but but wanted to connect with you via e-mail and ask for your help. i hope you will support this important treaty. the crpd is the first int
i am missing what that is called. we tried to get disability rights in there too. that an amendment to -- and that went by the wayside. there's plenty of projects to focus on in the future. i love san francisco. many of our leaders going to state government. you have such an opportunity here to affect policy. you have an opportunity to provide a model as a person with a disability. someone other than what we have seen in movies in the past. mr. magoo cartoons, and i'm dating myself. let me say, there are many respectful ways to acknowledge our differences. if you're coming from respect, it's okay. you will find a way. i have enjoyed all the colleagues i have worked with. please try not to take your position for granted. you are a source of power of your own. take joy in working together. this is probably one of the most satisfying experiences of my life to see that i as a person with a hearing impairment can go out into my community and become engaged. i can participate and brainstorming a group. that is what we have going on in our committee. folks here on tv, don't s
francisco connected program reaches all of our seniors, all of the people with disabilities. there is no reason why people ocean not be connected up, and therefore -- no reason why people should not be connected up, there for everybody gets to enjoy the fantastic technology that we have. this is what makes a great city. this is why i enjoy working with you and being the mayor of our great san francisco city. thank you, ann. congratulations on your third summit. thank you very much. [applause] if brian roberts is in the room, thank you for writing that print. it is wonderful for getting us to where we are today. thank you very much. -- thank you for writing that grant. [applause] >> it is true, there are a lot of wonderful things about san francisco. there is all of us. there is all that marvelous food. and we have terrific leadership. it is important that we have good leadership in the departments, the mayor's office, and in our budget office. but, likewise, really important that we have great leadership in our board of supervisors. david chiu is the president of our board,
should have to face thelma's, disability, or caregiving on their own. there are growing numbers -- why we did pay attention to this, constantly reaching out in creating our own networks, keeping them informed is one major reason, there are more and more of us living alone. 40% of people over 60 live alone. we are more vulnerable in terms of how we are living and we are more vulnerable because those of us are living with chronic and complex diseases. that can lead and capacity to it is a very positive thing to do. what we might think of as our desire is for the company and so on, our health is a social affair. our health is intimately tied with our connections and support. when we have a good network around us, we heal more quickly, we live longer. and when we are isolated, it impacts things like hospital rea admissions, the number of doctors' visits, the capacity to handle stress. what we want to really focus on in terms of the number-one lesson is that no one should have to face these things alone. and when we consciously reached out to create a network, we are better off. let's think ab
at the end of the evening, on different types of disability advocacy. i remember your advice and counsel, and input on some of those issues when i had challenges. there is not enough words that i can possibly say to illustrate my respect. the abilities that you have, and the advocacy. you hit the ground running. you will be missed. when i looked to my right -- no offense to you wendy, you're great -- i will miss you for a while. i want to thank you for being my friend and colleague in teaching me so much. i plan to keep in contact with you and to hear about what you are doing and vice versa. thank you. it's been a pleasure and an honor. i said that without a tear, that was good. >> thank you. what you folks don't know is this young lady here i first met way prior to the mayor disability council. she was working for a phone company. i went to get my tty phone there. she was so effervescent and bright. she said to me, go on. show the people how it works. this opportunity. we all learn together. it's okay how we are. i feel so blessed. it's like light attract light. when people come
>> >> >> >> >> >> chair: you are back with the mayor's disability council friday, november 16, 2012. thank you for rejoining us. our next agenda item is an action item. it is the co-chair election. for the position of co-chair, wendy james has successfully executed her leadership role for one year. her position is now up for a vote. we will accept nominations. offered by oneself were nominated by one's colleagues. the first to cue in is co-chair james. >> co-chair: i would like to nominate myself and continue as co-chair for another year and continue to learn how to co-chair. >> (off mic) >> chair: okay. we have one nomination, and one second. do we have any further nominations for the co-chair position? >> yes. >> chair: roland? >> councilmember wong: i like to dominate idell wilson. nominate. (correction) nominate (laughter) >> i would really say, i would be honored. i would like to third, for wendy to have a second year. >> chair: you are declining the nomination? are there any further nominations? seeing none, okay, this is where we have to reserve the public comment. we h
become the chair of the mayor's disability council. i like the idea, for sure. >> chair: mr. stein? >> yes. i don't see any conflict between staying two consecutive terms, and the council setting up whatever rules it wants to have informally of the discussion in executive committee. we think there should be a two month mentoring program for someone interested in serving on the council. we should make that three months or six months of chairing the committee. we don't need to decide that now. it is not something that appears in the bylaws. in a sense incorporating the concept gives you more freedom rather than trying to thrash this particular concept out here at this meeting. there is nothing to prevent the council from having a role. cr rule. >> chair: is there anyone uncomfortable with the proposed amendment as it is written? >> maybe i can talk a little bit about it. >> chair: i want to announce you. >> i think it's good -- to have different councilmembers take a leadership. i don't know how to word it, sorry. as far as making a motion to make this change. i don't know how
with disabilities and seniors face living in single room occupancy hotels. this was very much grass roots activism on the part of the sro collaborative, the mission sro collaborative, senior action network who of course now has merged with planning for elders and is senior and disability action. and these community groups really did the job of making the case that there are so many people in the city that are aging in place and older buildings and that there is a great need to have basic safety features to allow people to live with safety and with dignity and independence in the community in accordance with our civil rights, you know, as what's affirmed under the olmstead decision to support people living in the community. so this legislation that was introduced i think is a very important step towards supporting people here and you can expect to be hearing more about it over the next two months and i would encourage everybody to come to the hearings as the legislation is actually discussed in committee and at the board and to voice your support. another piece of that legislation, too, would mand
, a report from the disability disaster preparedness committee. joanna >> good afternoon. actually my report will be extremely brief. as you know, the dupc now meets every other week -- every other month so we didn't meet last month. however, a small group, a small subcommittee, has been working on putting together a grant application for a fema innovation challenge award which is about $35,000 to do a small innovative project. after long deliberation we decided to work on a disaster preparedness initiative for sro owners -- for sro tenants. these, as you know, are some of the most challenging populations who have traditionally been ostracized or kept away from the typical disaster preparedness can urricula. our project is proposing to develop an innovate i've can you remember rim klupl using collectives and community organizers to get folks, around 300 residents, to develop a structure for developing culturally appropriate disaster can urriculum. we believe very strongly this is a project worthy of funding and possible to create some important work and important precedent and we
to forward these goals and maximize independence of seniors and persons with disabilities living in the community to reduce readmissions and of course ultimately reducing institutionalization. the san francisco care program, transitional care program, has been in operation since 2000. it collaborates now with 8 hospitals and 8 community-based organizations. the hospitals that are included in this are the california pacific medical center which includes the 3 campuses, the pacific, st. luke's and daly's, st. francis, ucsf and chinese hospital. the community-based organizations include of course the san francisco senior center, which is also part of ncphs, the institute on aging, catholic charities, self-help for the elderly, curry senior center, kimochi vernal heights senior care center. i'm going to turn it over to dana to explain about the program. >> so the san francisco transitional care program is a 4 to 6 week program that's going to be incorporating the coaching model of care. and in that they are going to be integrating self-care skills for the patients and by doing th
and in this community are a bubble of disability and none of this surprises us, the reality is that this discussion is a quantum leap from anything the city has had. even in the most recent years, we were not able to get disability demographics. we always staff about accessibility, and they would say next time. a number of people with disability in sros. the fact that we now have senior action network, the last 10 years would could not even get large print. oh yeah, they would see us there. there was never a demographic. if you don't have disability demographics you are not at the public policy planning table. i want to welcome jessica lehman to our community. she has been a leader in the alameda -- for many years. she's here totally on board with senior and disability action. it is huge. welcome. in the last survey we had from hsa, was an astounding percentage of seniors that get out of the rooms per month, 3-4 times a month, 60-70%. an amazing number. something a revelation to me. in 2005-06, i was on a panel in tenderloin. there was an elderly chinese woman in the room. the third person t
for extended time today? five minutes. thank you. the next item is a report from the disability disaster preparedness committee. >> thank you cochair parsons. >> chair: delivered by councilmember senhaux. >> disability disaster preparedness committee met on friday. there was a follow-up discussion on the shakeout activities that took place in october 18 and a disability specific activities. the mayor's disability council conducted an activation deal with the sou partners by text messaging the identifying contacts. the results were impressive. there was 100% response within 12 hours. we also discussed the civic center evacuation drill on october 25, about 10 buildings in the civic center area evacuated including city hall, the department of public health, and the war memorial building. as part of the evacuation drill, an ada portion the place as well where buildings that had to evacuate people with disabilities and use the evacuation chairs. the activity went well but it highlighted some areas of further staff training with the mayor's office and disability will follow up on.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,362 (some duplicates have been removed)